Six Stats About Women Everyone Should Know

Six Stats About Women Everyone Should Know

3/19/18

 

Women make up half of the world’s population; yet historically, they’ve been restricted from access to resources and opportunities and silenced when voicing their opinions or experiences. But perhaps most startling is the prevalence of violence against women and gender discrimination that persists in communities worldwide. In honor of Women’s History Month this March, read six statistics about women that everyone should know — and where we go from here.

 

1. At least one in three women globally will experience gender-based violence (GBV) in her lifetime.

One in three women will experience gender-based violence in her lifetime.

Women and girls around the world — from bustling cities to rural farms — face violence in their daily lives simply because of their gender. GBV can include rape, domestic violence, child marriage, sexual trafficking, female genital cutting and other harmful traditional practices. This violence leaves survivors with long-term psychological and physical trauma; tears away at the social fabric of communities and is used with terrifying effect in conflict settings, like Myanmar and Nigeria, with women as the main target.

2. 70% of people who experience sexual harassment do not report it.

70% of people who experience sexual harassment do not report it.

Even in the wake of #MeToo and #TimesUp, most women (and men) who experience sexual harassment won’t report it because they fear backlash, blame, retaliation, inaction or that they won’t be believed. However, without intervention, the cycle of violence is likely to continue in the next generation.  

3. Worldwide, 600 million women live in countries where domestic violence is legal.

600 million women live in countries where domestic violence is legal.

At least 140 countries have laws regarding domestic violence, and 144 countries have laws regarding sexual harassment, but that doesn’t guarantee these laws are enforced or that women are able to file complaints. Dozens of countries have no laws that protect women from domestic violence, and in some cultures, violence against women is normalized and accepted. 

4. Women are more likely than men to be paid below the minimum wage in Asia's garment industry. 

Women are more likely than men to be paid below the minimum wage in Asia's garment industry.

Gender inequities, power imbalances and a disregard for women’s rights to fair employment means that, in many of the countries where CARE works, millions of women are paid well below minimum wage and have no recourses available to them for legal action or reimbursement. Women with the lowest levels of education are usually paid the least amounts. 

5. Every day, nearly 39,000 girls under the age of 18 become child brides. That's about one every two seconds. 

Child marriage is a human rights violation that negatively impacts the girl or boy getting married.

Child marriage is a human rights violation that not only negatively impacts the girl or boy getting married, but also exacerbates the cycle of poverty for families, communities and countries. Child brides are less likely to complete their educations or earn money to support themselves and their families. Additionally, child brides are at a higher risk for being physically abused in their lifetime and contracting HIV or other diseases.  

6. More than one-third of the world's countries lack laws prohibiting sexual harassment at work — leaving nearly 235 million women vulnerable in the workplace.  

More than one-third of the world's countries lack laws prohibiting sexual harassment in the workplace.

Currently there’s no international legal standard protecting women from a diverse array of unwanted sexual advances, unwanted touching and other types of harassment commonly faced in the workplace. Many domestic workers hired to cook and clean in homes around the world begin working as children, making them that much more vulnerable and powerless to abuse.

Now that you know the statistics, what will you do to help?

For too long, women have quietly dealt with sexual abuse and harassment at work — but not anymore. Thanks to the bravery of women worldwide, the secrecy and silence surrounding abuse in the workplace is slowly being broken. Violence against women is more than just a Hollywood issue, it’s a global issue. That’s why CARE is advocating for the International Labour Organization (ILO) to adopt an international standard on violence and harassment at work that protects women everywhere. Now is the time to raise your voice and demand #ThisIsNotWorking.

Tell U.S. leaders to support a new ILO Convention and Recommendation and commit to making workplaces safe for women everywhere.  

 

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